Testing Services


Hygrothermal Testing

Comprehensive investigations, while extremely useful to identify issues with a building and its components, only provide a snap shot of the building at the time of inspection. Learning how a building functions on a daily basis; its wetting and drying cycles allow us to gain insight into the quality of construction and to more accurately pinpoint current or potential problems. That is where hygrothermal monitoring comes in. Hygrothermal monitoring is essentially the collection of moisture and temperature conditions within the building assemblies over a given amount of time (this could range anywhere from one month to one year).

Sensors embedded within the assemblies take regular measurements of the relative humidity and temperature within the cavity, pressure differences across the cladding and the moisture content of timber components. This data is then transmitted to our computers in the office where we can format and analyse the information – looking for patterns to better understand how the building is performing on a day-to-day basis.

The type and number of sensors used on a project is tailored to suit the goals and scope of that project. However, we try to incorporate a good range of sensors in several locations around the structure to obtain an overall perspective of the building’s performance.

Below are examples of units that have been installed in a current project.

A sensor configuration installed within a wall cavity. Moisture sensors have been installed at the base of the stud as well as the back of the cladding, with a temperature sensor taped to the building paper.

A sensor configuration installed within a wall cavity. Moisture sensors have been installed at the base of the stud as well as the back of the cladding, with a temperature sensor taped to the building paper.

An overall view of a typical cutout for sensor installation. Moisture and relative humdity sensors have been installed in the cavity before the cutout is sealed and patched over.

An overall view of a typical cutout for sensor installation. Moisture and relative humdity sensors have been installed in the cavity before the cutout is sealed and patched over.

A temperature/relative humidity graph from the collected data. Raw data from the data acquisition units was exported into Excel where it was formatted and plotted for easy interpretation.

A temperature/relative humidity graph from the collected data. Raw data from the data acquisition units was exported into Excel where it was formatted and plotted for easy interpretation.


Façade Testing

Using a calibrated spray rack we can simulate heavy weather conditions to test the performance of external cladding and windows. The interior is depressurised and a measured amount of water is delivered to the exterior wall. This process allows us to accurately identify where leaks lie and where water runs.

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